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Allergen Information

  • Dairy-Milk Dairy allergy, or milk allergy, refers to any allergic reaction caused by a component of cow’s milk. The three components of cow’s milk that cause dietary reactions are casein protein, whey protein, and lactose sugar. Casein and whey are considered more likely to cause true allergies, while lactose causes a wellknown intolerance in many adults (and some children) due to the body’s lack of an enzyme known as lactase.
  • Peanut Peanut allergy is a type of food allergy distinct from nut allergies. It is a hypersensitivity to dietary substances from peanuts causing an overreaction of the immune system which, in a small percentage of people, may lead to severe physical symptoms. It is usually treated with an exclusion diet and vigilant avoidance of foods that may be contaminated with whole peanuts or peanut particles and/or oils. The most severe peanut allergies can result in anaphylaxis, an emergency situation requiring immediate attention and treatment with epinephrine.
  • Shellfish Shellfish allergies are the most common allergy among adults in America. These types of allergies are reactions to two classes of foods: mollusks (which include clams, mussels, and oysters) and crustaceans (which include shrimp, lobster, and crabs). Although these two groups are fairly distant biological relatives, there is a high rate of allergic cross-reactivity between the two. Therefore, many people who are allergic to any type of shellfish are advised to avoid all shellfish. Shrimp is considered the most allergenic. The protein that most commonly causes shellfish allergies (tropomyosin) is also found in dust mites and cockroaches, and there is some evidence of cross-reactivity between shellfish and some insects.
  • Soy A soy allergy is an abnormal response of the body to the proteins found in soy. Soybeans are classified as a legume. Other foods in the legume family are navy, kidney, string, black, and pinto beans, chickpeas (garbanzo beans), lentils, carob, licorice, and peanuts. Sensitivity to peanuts is the most common, but soybean sensitivity is also prevalent. Sensitivity to one legume can often be in association with sensitivity to another legume. While soy per se is not that prevalent in the American diet, it is used in a wide variety of processed foods and in East Asian cuisine, making it challenging to avoid. It is also a staple protein in many vegetarian meals.
  • Tree Nuts Tree nut allergy is a hypersensitivity to dietary substances from tree nuts causing an overreaction of the immune system which may lead to severe physical symptoms. Nut allergy is slightly different from peanut allergy because the types of nuts that cause the allergic reactions are not the same. Peanuts are considered legumes whereas tree nuts are considered dry fruits. The symptoms of peanut allergy and nut allergy are the same, but a person with peanut allergies may not necessarily also be allergic to tree nuts, and vice versa.Tree nut allergies occur mainly, but not exclusively, in children. They are usually treated with an exclusion diet and vigilant avoidance of foods that may be contaminated with tree nuts or nut particles and/or oils. The most severe nut allergy reaction is called anaphylaxis and is an emergency situation requiring immediate attention and treatment with epinephrine. Tree nuts include macadamia nuts, Brazil nuts, cashews, almonds, walnuts, pecans, pistachios, chestnuts, beechnuts, hazelnuts, pine nuts (pignoli or pinon), gingko nuts and hickory nuts.
  • Gluten Gluten intolerance is associated with Celiac Disease, a genetic autoimmune condition. The celiac patient cannot digest Gluten. Gluten is the protein found in wheat, barley and rye, and their by-products.Gluten inflames the small intestine, which leads to mal-absorption of nutrients and other long-term problems. Symptoms include chronic fatigue and diarrhea, stomach cramping, extreme nausea and loss of weight. There is no treatment or cure for Celiac disease, yet a gluten-free diet quickly eliminates all symptoms.